Thursday, January 29, 2009

"Bishop Zimowski of Poland to Celebrate Mass at St. Agatha Church"

FROM THE ARCHDIOCESAN website:
On Saturday, January 31, 2009, at 11:00 a.m. St Agatha parish will honor the parish's patron saint with a special Mass celebrated by Bishop Zygmunt Zimowski of the Diocese of Radom in Poland, who is also a pastoral guardian for Poles living abroad. Bishop Robert Hermann and Rev. Msgr. Vernon Gardin will be present for this occasion.

Two special guest soloists from Warsaw Opera Theatre, Ryszard Wróblewski and Edyta Ciechomska-Bilska, will be performing during Mass and will give a short concert following the Mass (around 12:30 p.m.) in the Church. Following the concert, you are invited to join the parishioners for a luncheon with all the Bishops in the School Ballroom. Another concert will also be given at St. Agatha Church on Sunday, February 1, at 2 p.m.

Both soloists have accomplished musical careers: Ryszard Wróblewski, a tenor, is currently with the Grand Theatre in Warsaw. He gave performances at many prestigious opera theatres including Gdańsk, Warsaw and Poznań. He also performed internationally in Europe and the United States. His extensive repertoire includes a great number of tenor parts, such as, Don Jose in Bizet’s "Carmen," Stefan in Moniuszko’s "Haunted Manor," Pinkerton in "Madame Butterfly," Cavaradossi in Puccini’s "Tosca," etc. Tenor Wróblewski also performs oratorio, cantata and concert repertoire.

In 1995, soprano Edyta Ciechomska-Bilska graduated with honors from the musical academy in Warsaw. She is a laureate of Polish and international opera gala competitions. Even as a student, she took part in productions of Warsaw’s Grand Theatre and Warsaw’s Opera Theatre. As a professional artist, she has been a member of the Roma Musical Theatre in Warsaw. Her performances include among many: "Madame Butterfly," Micaela in "Carmen" and Pamina in "Magic Flute." Edyta Ciechomska-Bilska has performed many concerts in Poland and abroad.
Click here for some of my old photos of the church.

A Psalm of Thanksgiving

PSALM 99 (Septuagint numbering):
1 A psalm of praise.
2 Sing joyfully to God, all the earth: serve ye the Lord with gladness. Come in before his presence with exceeding great joy.
3 Know ye that the Lord he is God: he made us, and not we ourselves. We are his people and the sheep of his pasture.
4 Go ye into his gates with praise, into his courts with hymns: and give glory to him. Praise ye his name:
5 For the Lord is sweet, his mercy endureth for ever, and his truth to generation and generation.

REMINDER - Feast of Saint Francis de Sales and Mass for Journalists

From the website of Saint Francis de Sales Oratory in Saint Louis, Missouri:
On Thursday, January 29- 6:30pm, the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, a young community in the Church based in Florence/Italy, honors one of its patrons, St. Francis de Sales. The saint was named also the patron of journalists and writers because of his exceptional ability to communicate truth in a positive, charitable and understandable manner. Having been a missionary priest in France and the Bishop of Geneva in the late seventeenth century, St. Francis wrote numerous pamphlets on the Catholic faith which were distributed at that time in much the same way as print media today.

The Oratory and its rector, Canon Michael Wiener, invite especially all journalists to be part of a special evening: The Solemn High Mass will be celebrated in the classic Roman Rite and accompanied by Louis Vierne’s Messe Solenelle in C-sharp Minor for organ and choir. Because of its complexity, this music is rarely heard; it will be a fitting complement to the Gothic splendor of St. Francis de Sales and of this sublime liturgy.

The Oratory, which is located on the corner of Gravois and Ohio, presently organizes a campaign to restore the out- and inside of the magnificent structure, especially its 300- foot- high steeple. (For further information about this project see also: www.TraditionForTomorrow.com) or 314. 771. 3100.
From Introduction to the Devout Life, by Saint Francis de Sales:
...[S]in is shameful when we commit it, but when reduced to repentance and confession, it becomes salutary and honourable. Contrition and confession are in themselves so lovely and sweet-savoured, that they efface the ugliness and disperse the ill savour of sin. Simon the leper called Magdalene a sinner, but our Lord turned the discourse to the perfume of her ointment and the greatness of her love. If we are really humble, my daughter, our sins will be infinitely displeasing to us, because they offend God;—but it will be welcome and sweet to accuse ourselves thereof because in so doing we honour God; and there is always somewhat soothing in fully telling the physician all details of our pain.

When you come to your spiritual father, imagine yourself to be on Mount Calvary, at the Feet of the Crucified Saviour, Whose Precious Blood is dropping freely to cleanse you from all your sin. Though it is not his actual Blood, yet it is the merit of that outpoured Blood which is sprinkled over His penitents as they kneel in Confession. Be sure then that you open your heart fully, and put away your sins by confessing them, for in proportion as they are put out, so will the Precious Merits of the Passion of Christ come in and fill you with blessings.

Tell everything simply and with straightforwardness, and thoroughly satisfy your conscience in doing so. Then listen to the admonitions and counsels of God’s Minister, saying in your heart, “Speak, Lord, for Thy servant heareth.” It is truly God to Whom you hearken, forasmuch as He has said to His representatives, “Whoso heareth you, heareth Me.”


— CHAPTER XIX. How to make a General Confession.

Photos of the Old Courthouse, in downtown Saint Louis, Missouri

THE OLD COURTHOUSE, in downtown Saint Louis, is one of the very few buildings in the older part of the City which escaped the destruction of urban renewal. Famous as a rendezvous point for pioneers heading westward and for the Dred Scott trial, this former judicial building is now a museum.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - exterior

The Old Courthouse is at the center of downtown, and faces Kiener Plaza, in the foreground, and the Gateway Mall, behind the camera. Along the same axis is the Gateway Arch, in the background.

From the National Park Service website:
The original courthouse was constructed of brick in the Federal style of architecture and completed in 1828. The population of St. Louis grew three fold during this period due to the booming fur trade, and the courthouse was outgrown ten years after it opened. A second courthouse was designed by architect Henry Singleton, which incorporated the original courthouse as the east wing of the building.

The second courthouse was designed with four wings and a dome in the center of its axis. The cornerstone was laid in 1839 and within it were placed newspapers of various cities, an assortment of coins, and names of officers of government. Three tiers of balconies or galleries viewed the rotunda floor. Pillars of stone supported the first gallery, while white oak columns supported the upper two galleries. There were offices and courtrooms located throughout the building. The maximum number of courtrooms in use at one time was twelve, although fifteen different rooms were used over the duration of the courthouse's operations.

The Old Courthouse underwent a second period of construction beginning in 1851. The original brick courthouse was demolished and replaced with a new east wing. Between 1855 and 1858 the west wing was remodeled due to unsound second floor construction. The lower floor was divided into a hallway and two courtrooms to support the floor above. The Dred Scott trial occurred in the original lower west courtroom before it was remodeled.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - view up into dome

A view up into the dome.

Continuing from the NPS history:
Due to the extensive remodeling, the original dome, a classic revival style, was replaced. The new dome was of wrought and cast iron with a copper exterior in an Italian Renaissance style. In 1861, the Federal government was constructing a similarly styled dome for the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. Both domes were modeled after the dome in St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. Controversy was sparked when naysayers assumed the dome in St. Louis would be too heavy to be supported. The architect of the dome, William Rumbold, constructed a test model dome and proved it was sound. Once the dome was complete, Carl Wimar was commissioned to paint murals, in eye-shaped openings called "lunettes," on the interior of the dome. The subjects of the lunettes were four significant benchmarks in St. Louis history. A redecoration of Wimar's work occurred in 1880 by Ettore Miragoli with his own paintings. In 1888 August Becker restored the original Wimar paintings. Moisture and decay occurred over the years, and in 1905 and 1921 two more restorations were made.

The Old Courthouse was abandoned by the City of St. Louis in 1930 because the growth of the city required additional court space and a new structure had been completed a few blocks to the west. During the following ten years the older building was used for an art school and a workshop for a religious organization that refurbished toys for needy children. It also served as offices for two justices of the peace and their constables.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - centered view up into dome

A dizzying view looking straight up.  The dome has two layers; the interior is seen here, with a space above for maintenance of the exterior dome.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - floor of the rotunda

The limestone floor of the rotunda is worn smooth after over a century of use. The acoustics here are excellent; in the days before electronic sound amplification, public speakers could address large numbers of people on the floor and the three balconies. The Roman Emperor Constantine built a number of round churches of this layout, and we also find lecture halls of similar design in the ancient universities of Europe. Best acoustics are found if the speaker is off to one side.

Our word ‘rotunda’ comes from the Italian, rotonda camera, ‘round chamber’

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - diorama of villiage life in colonial Sainte Genevieve

The building houses a number of museum exhibits. Here is a diorama of colonial life in Sainte Genevieve, Missouri. Many buildings of this type from the colonial period still exist in that town, which is located about 64 highway miles south of the Old Courthouse.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - map of explorations west of the Mississippi, 1804-41

The Manifest Destiny of the United States.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - staircase

Staircase to the second floor.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - middle of rotunda

Another view of the rotunda.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Door to Circuit Court #13

Up to twelve courtrooms were once found in this building, and two have been restored.

This building incorporates a significant amount of natural lighting; this hallway is illumined by a large skylight above. And like many buildings of the period, ceilings are high, which helps keep rooms somewhat cooler in the summertime.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Circuit Courtroom #13

Circuit Court #13 has been restored to its appearance of about 1910.

The Dred Scott courtroom no longer exists. Dred Scott was a slave who sued for his freedom from bondage; his case eventually led to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled that African slaves were not persons, had no standing in court, and were not eligible for citizenship. This was one of the events which led to the American Civil War.  Click here for some of my old photos of the courthouse and commentary of the Dred Scott case.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Circuit Courtroom #4

Circuit Court #4, as it appeared in the mid-19th century.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - staircase and skylight

Stairs leading up into the dome. Another skylight is above, and an opening in the floor, seen here, directs daylight below.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - ceiling of dome

At the top of the dome is a lantern, which admits more light.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - detail of interior of dome

The interior of the dome and its supporting drum are decorated with paintings of historical persons and events, symbols of the State and Republic, and allegorical figures.

Old Courthouse, Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - view of Gateway Arch between columns

The Arch, seen between the courthouse's columns.

Interview with Archbishop Burke



Photo of Hilary White and Archbishop Raymond Burke in Rome.

Click here for Hilary's exclusive interview with Archbishop Burke, at LifeSite News.
A document of the US Catholic Bishops is partly to blame for the abandonment of pro-life teachings by voting Catholics and the election of the “most pro-abortion president” in US history, one of the Vatican’s highest officials said in an interview with LifeSiteNews.com.

“Archbishop Raymond Burke, the prefect of the Apostolic Signatura, named a document on the election produced by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops that he said “led to confusion” among the faithful and led ultimately to massive support among Catholics for Barack Obama.
More tough talk from LifeSite:

MUST READ: Bishop Hermann of St. Louis – Strongest Ever Pro-Life Column
Bishop Hermann: 'I thought you should know’
"Stimulus" Bill Still Includes $335 Million Handout for Condoms, Sex-Ed Programs

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Saint Louis in 1817

View of Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - 1817

This engraving on a ten dollar note issued by the Bank of St. Louis in 1817 provides the earliest known illustration of St. Louis.
— from an exhibit at the Old Courthouse, in downtown Saint Louis, Missouri.
This illustration shows a European-style walled town on the first terrace above the river, a vertical-log building to the left, and a watch-tower in the background.

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Rumor Has It...

...that Pope Benedict will lift the excommunications on the Bishops of the Society of Saint Pius X.

I've also noticed that the media usually states that ‘improving relations with the SSPX’ is the only reason why Pope Benedict widened the availability of Mass according to the Latin Missale Romanum of 1962. Also, news reports just surfaced claiming that the SSPX is anti-Semitic: this at the same time as the rumor about the excommunications started. Connect the dots.

The restoration of the Liturgy has an importance far exceeding good relations with the SSPX, although the Society certainly got the ball rolling decades ago. Read the Spirit of the Liturgy by Joseph Ratzinger for more details.

UPDATED - excommunications lifted:  click here for notice (in Italian).

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

cat

One of my cats.

TELEGRAMMA DEL SANTO PADRE BENEDETTO XVI AL 44mo PRESIDENTE DEGLI STATI UNITI D’AMERICA BARACK OBAMA

TELEGRAMMA DEL SANTO PADRE BENEDETTO XVI AL 44mo PRESIDENTE DEGLI STATI UNITI D’AMERICA BARACK OBAMA, IN OCCASIONE DEL SUO INSEDIAMENTO ALLA CASA BIANCA , 20.01.2009

THE HONORABLE BARACK OBAMA
PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON, DC

ON THE OCCASION OF YOUR INAUGURATION AS THE FORTY-FOURTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA I OFFER CORDIAL GOOD WISHES, TOGETHER WITH THE ASSURANCE OF MY PRAYERS THAT ALMIGHTY GOD WILL GRANT YOU UNFAILING WISDOM AND STRENGTH IN THE EXERCISE OF YOUR HIGH RESPONSIBILITIES. UNDER YOUR LEADERSHIP MAY THE AMERICAN PEOPLE CONTINUE TO FIND IN THEIR IMPRESSIVE RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL HERITAGE THE SPIRITUAL VALUES AND ETHICAL PRINCIPLES NEEDED TO COOPERATE IN THE BUILDING OF A TRULY JUST AND FREE SOCIETY, MARKED BY RESPECT FOR THE DIGNITY, EQUALITY AND RIGHTS OF EACH OF ITS MEMBERS, ESPECIALLY THE POOR, THE OUTCAST AND THOSE WHO HAVE NO VOICE. AT A TIME WHEN SO MANY OF OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD YEARN FOR LIBERATION FROM THE SCOURGE OF POVERTY, HUNGER AND VIOLENCE, I PRAY THAT YOU WILL BE CONFIRMED IN YOUR RESOLVE TO PROMOTE UNDERSTANDING, COOPERATION AND PEACE AMONG THE NATIONS, SO THAT ALL MAY SHARE IN THE BANQUET OF LIFE WHICH GOD WILLS TO SET FOR THE WHOLE HUMAN FAMILY (cf. Isaiah 25:6-7). UPON YOU AND YOUR FAMILY, AND UPON ALL THE AMERICAN PEOPLE, I WILLINGLY INVOKE THE LORD’S BLESSINGS OF JOY AND PEACE

BENEDICTUS PP. XVI
Source.

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Photos of Blessed Sacrament Church, in Belleville, Illinois

HERE ARE PHOTOS of Blessed Sacrament Church, in Belleville, Illinois. It is located about 12 highway miles southwest of downtown Saint Louis, Missouri, and is a part of the Diocese of Belleville.

Blessed Sacrament Roman Catholic Church, in Belleville, Illinois, USA - exterior

The parish dates from 1926, and is located in the west end of town.

Blessed Sacrament Roman Catholic Church, in Belleville, Illinois, USA - mosaic over front door

Mosaic over the front door, showing the Eucharistic symbol of the pelican, sacrificing its own life to feed its chicks.

Blessed Sacrament Roman Catholic Church, in Belleville, Illinois, USA - school

Blessed Sacrament School.


Prayer for those engaged in Public Affairs

Great Intercession, from the Liturgy of Good Friday, 1962 Missale Romanum:
OREMUS et pro omnibus res publicas moderantibus, eorumque ministeriis et potestatibus: ut Deus et Dominus noster mentes et corda eorum secundum voluntatem suam dirigat ad nostram perpetuam pacem.

Oremus. Flectamus genua… Levate.

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, in cujus manu sunt omnium potestates et omnium jura populorum: respice benignus ad eos, qui nos in potestate regunt; ut ubique terrarum, dextera tua protegente, et religionis integritas, et patriæ securitas indesinenter consistat. Per Dominum... R. Amen.
English translation:
Let us pray too for all engaged in affairs of state and for all their ministries and powers: that our God and Lord may guide according to His will their minds and hearts, to our lasting peace.

Let us pray. Let us kneel. Arise.

Almighty and everlasting God, in whose hands dwell all might and the rights of every people: look favorably on those who wield power over us; and let Thy right hand protect us, that, all the world through, both religious integrity and our country's security may be firmly based and abide. Through our Lord... R. Amen.

Auguries

OUR ENGLISH WORD ‘inauguration’, comes from the Latin inaugurat, which refers to the auguries, or interpretation of omens, used in an attempt to determine if a particular course of action is auspicious.

I noticed that President Obama, during his Oath of Office, stumbled over the word faithfully. During his speech, he used the phrase “new age” twice. I leave the interpretation of these ‘omens’ as an exercise to my readers!
“The establishment of our new Government seemed to be the last great experiment for promoting human happiness by reasonable compact in civil Society.
Letter of George Washington to Catherine Macaulay Graham: New York, January 9th, 1790.

The first President of the United States of America was optimistic about the Republic which he helped found, and of which he was the great figurehead.

Today is the inauguration of the latest President of the United States of America, Barack Hussein Obama II. While I wish him well, I hold out little hope for the future of the Republic.

The moral order has been overthrown, and power is to be centralized on an unprecedented scale.

Sunday, January 18, 2009

Photo of Saint Mark Church, in Affton, Missouri

Saint Mark Roman Catholic Church, in Affton, Missouri, USA - exterior

Saint Mark Parish, in Affton, Missouri, is located in an old Benedictine monastery, along with archdiocesan offices and a Byzantine Catholic chapel.

Friday, January 16, 2009

Food for your iPod

CHURCH HISTORY lectures are available at the website of Fr. Michael Witt.

Looks Familiar

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, in Springfield, Illinois, USA - statue.jpg

Back in September, 2007, I took this photo of a statue of Saint Paul, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, in Springfield, Illinois.

2009 Directory - Diocese of Springfield in Illinois - featuring cover photo by Mark Scott Abeln

Here is the 2009 directory for the Diocese of Springfield in Illinois.
“In the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Springfield, the statue of St. Paul the Apostle is located high above the main altar at the north side of the sanctuary. This photograph, by Mark Scott Abeln of St. Louis, was chosen for the cover of this year's pastoral directory in honor of the Pauline Year.”
Msgr. Kemme kindly sent me this copy.

Call No Man Happy

AN OFT QUOTED phrase of the philosophers, "Call no many happy until he is dead," reminds us that the future is uncertain.

See the article It’s official: Make way for Obama Boulevard. Delmar Boulevard in Saint Louis is to be renamed in honor of our President-Elect.

The naming of things is a serious matter, best done with much consideration. Saint Louisians perhaps remember the embarrassment which followed the renaming of a stretch of Interstate 70 as the 'Mark McGwire Highway'.

Prudence tells us that we ought to wait until after someone is dead before we rename something in their honor. Or, at the very least, after the honoree has reached a ripe age, and has retired from public life.

But as it so happens, the City Aldermen hedged their bets, and only voted on an honorary renaming. Delmar is still the official street name, and only six street signs will be posted, along with — and not replacing — the existing signs.

Photo of Ruins in Tower Grove Park

Ruins in Tower Grove Park, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

These picturesque "ruins" in Tower Grove Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, were actually assembled here by park founder Henry Shaw. They are remains from the Lindell Hotel, which was destroyed by fire in 1867. Admiration of old ruins had become popular by the European Grand Tour, and led to the construction of follies such as this.

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Oratory to Offer Mass for Journalists


Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest

St. Francis de Sales Oratory

2653 Ohio Avenue

Saint Louis, Missouri 63118

p. 314. 771. 3100

f. 314. 771. 3295

www.institute-christ-king.org

www.traditionfortomorrow.com

 

 

Feast of the Patron of Journalists at the St. Francis de Sales Oratory

 

On January 29th-6:30pm, the Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, a young community in the Church based in Florence/Italy, honors one of its patrons, St. Francis de Sales. The saint was named also the patron of journalists and writers because of his exceptional ability to communicate truth in a positive, charitable and understandable manner. Having been a missionary priest in France and the Bishop of Geneva in the late seventeenth century, St. Francis wrote numerous pamphlets on the Catholic faith which were distributed at that time in much the same way as print media today. 

 

The Oratory and its rector, Canon Michael Wiener, invite especially all journalists to be part of a special evening: The Mass will be celebrated in the classic Roman Rite and accompanied by Louis Vierne’s Messe Solenelle in C-sharp Minor for organ and choir. Because of its complexity, this music is rarely heard; it will be a fitting complement to the Gothic splendor of St. Francis de Sales and of this sublime liturgy.

 

The Oratory, which is located on the corner of Gravois and Ohio, presently organizes a campaign to restore the out- and inside of the magnificent structure, especially its 300- foot- high steeple. (For further information about this project see also: www.TraditionForTomorrow.com) or 314. 771. 3100.

 

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Ave Maris Stella

THE HYMN Ave Maris Stella is what I have to translate for Latin class by this Saturday. I'll try not to look up a translation until then!

Monday, January 12, 2009

Adversus Lucerna Florescens

MY FATHER ONCE worked as a project engineer, where he was in charge of the design and development of room temperature-regulation devices such as thermostats for home and commercial properties. He tells of a room, warmed with radiant ceiling and baseboard heaters: even though the air temperature would be 50° Fahrenheit (10° Celsius), it still felt comfortable.

It seems that our natural perception of warmth and coolness is not primarily determined by air temperature; rather, our senses may instead measure infrared radiation, that is, the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is lower in frequency than red-colored light. Infrared is invisible to the eye, but still can be felt by the skin.

A few weeks back, I spent some time outside: it was a brilliant, clear day; the air temperature was about 25° F. (-4° C.), without wind, but I was completely comfortable without wearing a coat or hat. I did have to turn around a bit to warm up the various sides of my body, but clearly the radiant heat from the sun was sufficient for my comfort. Infrared photography confirms this: skies thus photographed are black and therefore are transparent to that kind of radiation from the sun. Likewise, campfires have long been used to keep people warm outdoors, even in very cold climates; even though the fires only warm the air above them, their tremendous infrared radiation is sufficient for human warmth.

Human skin and many garments are transparent to a wide range of infrared radiation, and the most important source of heat loss in humans is via the same radiation of infrared. (The other major mechanism of heat loss is sweat, and the presence of wind is often important). And so logic and physics tells us that the most efficient source of human heat gain is also infrared radiation.

A while back, I discussed this phenomenon with a physician friend of mine, who was also interested in this; he believed that it was insufficiently studied, and could be a fruitful area for future research. So, please allow me to offer some speculation on the subject of artificial heating and illumination.

For the sake of energy efficiency, we are told that we ought to replace wasteful incandescent lamps with efficient fluorescent bulbs. Governments have even started banning or restricting incandescent light bulbs. This seems to make sense, for most of the radiant energy given off by the old light bulbs is invisible infrared radiation, and is therefore wasted.

Or is this energy really wasted? Please recall that this infrared radiation is perceived as warmth, in a very strong way, and may be far more important to the perception of warmth than air temperature. If a room is re-bulbed from incandescent to fluorescent lamps, how much warmer will the room's air temperature have to be to feel the same? Please note that this relationship probably still has not been thoroughly investigated. The room where I am typing this has two 60-watt incandescent bulbs in a ceiling fixture: I've noticed that when I have the lights on, I am able to keep the air temperature at least 5° F. cooler than when the light is off, and feel equally comfortable. If I were to replace these bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps, this temperature advantage would be lost. In the big picture, which is the most efficient? Would people tend to turn up the thermostat in fluorescent-lit rooms? (I ought to note that in the summertime, I rarely use either electric lighting or air conditioning.)

Of course, as always, turn off the lights as you leave the room. Didn't your mom tell you that?

I do use fluorescents in the lights I use for security, like my front porch, where electrical efficiency actually is important. I also enjoy 'light emitting diode' lamps for flashlights, where electrical efficiency is extremely important.



As I've gotten more serious about photography, I've noticed that fluorescent lighting is inferior in color quality compared to daylight and incandescent lamps. Fluorescent lights generally give off a sickly green color, quite evident in photos. And when fluorescent and incandescent lights are mixed in the same photo, the contrast between the relative green and magenta light given off by them produces a terrible-looking photograph. The same goes for natural daylight coming from the windows, which is also relatively magenta compared to fluorescent.

I find that my photos of church interiors are better if fluorescent lights are off. Incandescent lighting, daylight, or candlelight, is more beautiful.

The whole variation of natural lighting forms a harmonious range of color: from the very blue light in shade, to the white light of the sun high in the sky, down to yellow candlelight. Incandescent lights match this harmonious range of color from blue to yellow, and a mixture of these colors looks better in a photograph than does the green-to-magenta variation seen with fluorescent lighting. Although I typically correct a photo for the color of the light, the eye is tolerant of wide variations between this natural blue and yellow, and is biased towards accepting yellow. The eye strongly rejects a green/magenta light color variation in a photo, which looks just plainly bad. This natural range of the color of light is known scientifically as a 'black body spectrum', which typically includes a large amount of invisible infrared radiation, which we discussed earlier.

As bad as fluorescent lights are, even more efficient light sources, such as sodium vapor lamps, are even more awful when it comes to color quality. While there are plausibly good reasons for using these outdoors, I cannot think of any convincing reason to use them indoors.

Besides luminous ugliness, there are also health concerns regarding fluorescent lighting, which I will not go into here due to my ignorance.



These arguments in favor of incandescent lights also apply to candles, which deserve some discussion at some other time.

Incandescent lights still have their use, and ought to be thoughtfully reconsidered before being banned.

Msgr. Richard Stika Named Bishop of Knoxville

MONSIGNOR Richard Stika has been named Bishop of Knoxville, Tennessee, by Pope Benedict XVI.

Annunziata Roman Catholic Church, in Ladue, Missouri, USA

Msgr. Stika was pastor of Annunziata Church, in Ladue, Missouri, which is seen here.

Click here for an article from the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Christmas Photos at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri

PHOTOS at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, located in the Boulevard Heights neighborhood of south Saint Louis, Missouri, just west of Carondelet Park. The parish dates from 1951.

Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Christmas crèche

Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - sanctuary decorated for Christmas

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Yes, it can be done

HERE IS A LINK to an article, New World Byzantine - The Work of Andrew Gould, at the New Liturgical Movement.

Looks Familiar

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Zell, Missouri, USA - view from distance with pigs

A view of Saint Joseph Church, in Zell, Missouri, which I took on December 17th, 2007.



The cover of the January 2009 issue of the Missouri Historical Review.
Cover Description: Many smaller cities and towns, as well as urban centers, in Missouri became home to German immigrants in the mid- to late nineteenth century, but the new arrivals did not simply strike out on their own; they often followed or were accompanied by family and friends from home. Walter D. Kamphoefner discusses how his research on Missouri’s German heritage led him to the idea of chain migrations to towns like the pictured Zell, Missouri, in “Uprooted or Transplanted? Reflections on Patterns of German Immigration to Missouri,” beginning on page 71. [Mark Abeln, St. Louis, MO]

Thursday, January 08, 2009

Fr. Richard John Neuhaus, R.I.P.

Announcement at First Things:
Fr. Richard John Neuhaus slipped away today, January 8, shortly before 10 o’clock, at the age of seventy-two. He never recovered from the weakness that sent him to the hospital the day after Christmas, caused by a series of side effects from the cancer he was suffering. He lost consciousness Tuesday evening after a collapse in his heart rate, and the next day, in the company of friends, he died.
My tears are not for him—for he knew, all his life, that his Redeemer lives, and he has now been gathered by the Lord in whom he trusted.
I weep, rather for all the rest of us. As a priest, as a writer, as a public leader in so many struggles, and as a friend, no one can take his place. The fabric of life has been torn by his death, and it will not be repaired, for those of us who knew him, until that time when everything is mended and all our tears are wiped away.
Funeral arrangements are still being planned; information about the funeral will be made public shortly. Please accept our thanks for all your prayers and good wishes.
In Deepest Sorrow,
Joseph Bottum
Editor
First Things

Photos at the Museum

THE BASEMENT OF the Saint Louis Art Museum is, for me, the most interesting part of the building. Containing mainly what are called 'decorative arts', this floor contains objects of art that date from a time or state of mind where utility and æsthetics were happily married and living in beautiful harmony. On the museum's main floor, the conceits of the Renaissance are apparent, with each spouse bickering for their freedom and rights.

I usually avoid the museum's top floor, where (so to speak) æsthetics has completed an angry, bitter divorce from her spouse utility, and where she pretends that she is happy with her hollow freedom, while also trying to convince herself (and us) that she is still young and beautiful. Her cold, heartless ex-husband utility is enjoying his freedom by manufacturing generic pre-fabricated buildings at the lowest possible cost.

So in the basement I remain, surrounded by the decorative arts, which are children of a happy marriage. Besides Western European and American decorative arts, the basement also contains art from Egypt, sub-Saharan Africa, and Oceania, which also embody this same spirit of harmony.

In the basement you can also find an excellent gift shop and café, both well worth patronizing.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - ceramic squirrel

A ceramic squirrel bottle.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - carriage clock

Carriage clock: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariæ — The Angel of the Lord declared unto Mary.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - romantic painting of a young lady

A charming depiction of femininity, nearly lost in our age.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Mediaeval tomb cover

Tomb cover of Ulrich and Elisabeth von Erbach.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - suits of armor

Chivalry, at its best, adhered to the command "Love your enemies", and cared for honor more than victory. Chronicles often show bitter enemies becoming friends due to honorable conduct during warfare.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - helm

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - chain mail

Chain mail. This had to be cleaned by rolling it around in a barrel full of sand or oily sawdust.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - pikes

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - pikes 2

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - pistols

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - firearms

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - crossbow

A crossbow and a crank used for pulling the bow back.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - daggers

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - mummy

The museum has several Egyptian mummies.  Requiescant in pace.

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Egyptian statue

Saint Louis Art Museum, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Egyptian cat

These are just crude snapshots, but I hope you enjoyed them!

Wednesday, January 07, 2009

Ducks

Ducks, at the boatdock of the Boathouse in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - mainly Mallard specie

Ducks, mainly Mallards, swim by the boat dock at the Boathouse, in Forest Park.

Tuesday, January 06, 2009