Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Photos of Saint Norbert Church, in Hardin, Illinois

HERE ARE PHOTOS of Saint Norbert Church, in Hardin, Illinois.  Located in rural Calhoun County, this church is approximately 60 highway miles northwest of downtown Saint Louis, Missouri.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - exterior

A beautiful and excellently maintained church, located in the village of Hardin, county seat of Calhoun County.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - nave

A lovely church.

Other Catholic churches in Calhoun County, previously featured here, are Saint Mary in Brussels, and Saint Joseph in Meppen.  These photos were taken on March 6th, 2009.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - altar

The altar.  Stained glass windows in the sanctuary show Saints Thérèse of Lisieux and Norbert.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - tabernacle

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - statues of the Holy Family

The Holy Family.

Saint Norbert Church is part of the Saint Francis of Assisi parish cluster (Calhoun County - North).  According to the diocesan directory, this parish has 996 Catholics in 364 families.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - altar of sacrifice and sanctuary arch

Arch above the sanctuary here depicts the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - baptismal font

A depiction of Saint John baptizing Our Lord decorates the lid of the baptismal font.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - statue of Saint Norbert

Statue of Saint Norbert (ca. 1080-1134).  Born into German aristocracy, Norbert lived a life a pleasure and accepted ordination as subdeacon merely as a means of gaining wealth and prestige. But he had a conversion when thrown off his horse by a lightning strike, and henceforth lived a life of poverty. He founded a religious order in the Prémontré valley near Laon, preached against heresy and laxity among the clergy, performed miracles, and helped restore unity to the Church.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - holy water font

Holy water font.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - stained glass window of Father Marquette

Stained glass window depicting Father Jacques Marquette, S. J. (1637-1675), who was in the party of the first Europeans to explore this region. The flanking panes depict symbols of the Indians.

Saint Norbert Roman Catholic Church, in Hardin, Illinois, USA - stained glass window of Saint Francis Cabrini

Window of Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917), the first canonized U.S. citizen, and foundress of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

The Joe Page Bridge over the Illinois River, in Hardin, Illinois, USA

Calhoun County is surrounded to the south and west by the Mississippi River, and to the east by the Illinois River, seen here.  This is the Joe Page Bridge in Hardin, dedicated in 1931, which is the only bridge into the county; travelers from the Saint Louis area typically cross the rivers by ferryboat.

Hardin, Illinois was originally named Child's Landing after Benjamin Childs, who settled here in 1835, and got its present name in 1847 after Col. John J. Hardin, killed in the Mexican War. 

“Catholic St. Louis: A Pictorial History” Now Available

Catholic_cover_final_rev

Catholic St. Louis: A Pictorial History

by noted historian William Barnaby Faherty, S.J.
with photography by Mark Scott Abeln

is now available.

$32.95 + tax (Missouri residents only) + $4.95 shipping

Click the button below to order online via PayPal.




Tax exempt Missouri organizations, please email me at

with your tax exemption number, and I will send you an invoice.

I offer 10% off the price to seminarians, clergy, and religious; please email me for this pricing.


Click here for the book's press release.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

_DSC8294

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game"

From Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri:

Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

Posted on Monday, April 27th, 2009 in Events

                    The Date: Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

                    The Time: 7:15 pm

                    The Game: St. Louis Cardinals vs Philadelphia Phillies

The Oratory has terrific tickets. Who’s coming? 

The Cardinals are back for four home games next week, starting with the Phillies on Monday and Tuesday. A generous benefactor has provided the Oratory with 15 seats in a luxury suite at Busch Stadium for Tuesday night’s game against the Phillies, last year’s World Series Champion.  

For a $100 minimum donation, you and your companions will see the Cardinals resume their home game advantage from a luxurious vantage point. In addition to comfortable indoor and outdoor seating, the luxury suite includes a big screen TV to see the replays, as well as convenient restroom facilities (a bonus during the flu season).

Come support the Oratory and enjoy a great evening with friends and family in a venerable American tradition - at the ball game!

To reserve your tickets, please contact the Oratory as soon as possible. Call (314) 771-3100 and ask for Jon Roche or Dana Cole, or email sfds@institute-christ-king.org, and arrange payment by check made out to ”The Friends of St. Francis de Sales, Inc.”    

Friday, April 24, 2009

Support Catholic Radio

COVENANT NETWORK, which broadcasts Catholic radio in the Mid-West, is finishing its pledge drive today. Consider donating to this worthy apostolate.

You can listen online here.

In the Saint Louis area, the network broadcasts on 1080 AM and 1460 AM, and hosts the local program "Catholic St. Louis" with Fr. William Barnaby Faherty, S.J.

Thursday, April 23, 2009

Upcoming Event at the Oratory


Email Newsletter

 

Saint Francis de Sales Oratory

2653 Ohio Avenue

Saint Louis, Missouri 63118

www.institute-christ-king.org

314-771-3100

 

 

21 April 2009

 

 

 

 

The Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest, with the St. Francis de Sales Oratory in St. Louis, welcomes wholeheartedly the Archbishop-elect, the Most Reverend Robert J. Carlson. After several months of generous prayers for a new bishop we joyfully assure His Excellency of our continued faithful support and prayers. The clergy and staff at the Oratory together with all the faithful share in the gratefulness of the whole Archdiocese for the appointment by His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI.

 

Therefore on Sunday, April 26, a Solemn “Te Deum” will be sung after the 10 am Mass at St. Francis de Sales Oratory. (The Te Deum is a hymn of thanksgiving, expressing the sentiment of deep gratefulness toward God Almighty for His benefits.)

 

Join us in praying for the new Shepherd of our Archdiocese!

 

Deo Gratias!

 

 

Canon Michael K. Wiener

Rector

Episcopal Pro-Delegate for the Implementation of the

Motu Proprio Summorum Pontificum in the Archdiocese of St. Louis

 

Ordinary schedule of Masses at the Oratory:

Daily: 8:00am Low Mass

Sunday: 8:00am Low Mass, 10:00 Solemn High Mass

Tuesday: 6:30pm Low Mass, followed by Perpetual Help devotions

Wednesday: 8am; 12:00 NOON, Low Mass

Thursday: 7:00pm Adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament with Benediction

First Friday: 7:00pm Solemn High Mass

Holy Days: 8:00am, and 12:10pm, 7:00pm Solemn High Mass

Confessions/ Holy Rosary 30mins before all Masses

 


Tamm Avenue Spring

Tamm Avenue Spring, in Francis Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - sunset

The Tamm Avenue Spring at sunset, in Francis Park, Saint Louis, Missouri.

Saint Raphael the Archangel

Saint Raphael Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri - angel.jpg
At Saint Raphael the Archangel Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri.

For the intention of a friend:
St. Raphael, you were sent by God to guide young Tobias in choosing a good and virtuous spouse. Please help her in this important choice which will affect her whole future. You not only directed Tobias in finding a wife, but you also gave him guidelines which should be foremost in every Christian marriage: “Pray together before making important decisions.”

Amen.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Normandy, Missouri - the "Little Rome of the West", part 1

NOWHERE IN the Saint Louis area was there such a concentration of Catholic institutions as was found in and around Normandy, Missouri. This inner-ring suburb of the City of Saint Louis, located about 11 highway miles northwest of downtown, is now largely the domain of the University of Missouri - Saint Louis.

Click here for part 2.

Newman Center, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Bel-Nor, Missouri, USA - exterior view from side

This is the University's Catholic Newman Center, located in a former residence in the village of Bel-Nor, one of the many small communities surrounding Normandy.

The fact that there are 91 municipalities in Saint Louis County is troubling to some, especially among those who value efficiency, standardization, and centralization. Normandy is at the center of the greatest concentration of small municipalities in the County: Bel-Nor, Bel-Ridge, Bellerive, Greendale, Cool Valley, Pasadena Hills, Pasadena Park, Glen Echo Park, Greendale, Beverly Hills, Norwood Court, Northwoods, Country Club Hills, Velda City, Velda Village Hills, Pine Lawn, Uplands Park, Hillsdale, Saint John, Hanley Hills, Vinita Terrace, Vinita Park and others are within a short distance. Many newly-prosperous Irish Catholics moved to this area starting in the 19th century; they knew that government serves best when it is local, and when its leaders are friends and neighbors.

Newman Center, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Bel-Nor, Missouri, USA - chapel

The chapel in the Newman Center, with the tabernacle. You may notice that the walls need repair: perhaps you could donate your time or money for its repair. Much thanks to Fr. Bill Kempf, Director of the Newman Center and Archdiocesan priest, who generously spent time telling me the history of this area.

Wilson Price Hunt house, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

The Wilson Price Hunt house, now a business, built by a member of the founding family of Normandy, and completed in 1904.

Charles Lucas (1792-1817) was a land speculator who purchased properties from distressed landowners following the massive earthquakes in New Madrid of 1811-1812, as well as being the recipient of government land grants. Lucas named his estate ‘Normandy’ after the homeland of his father, Jean Baptiste Charles Lucas, born in Pont-Audemer, Normandy, France. His home was on the property of what is now the Incarnate Word Academy, seen below.

Lucas was killed in a duel against fellow lawyer (and later United States Senator) Thomas Hart Benton, and his land passed to his brother James and sister Ann Lucas. Part of his land eventually became the University of Missouri, but many felt insult upon the naming of the first new building - Benton Hall - after Lucas' killer.

Ann Lucas built her home “The Shelter” in 1820. Located at 7836 Natural Bridge Road, the property eventually became the convent of Our Lady of the Cenacle, and now belongs to the Normandy School District. Ann married Theodore Hunt, who died in 1832, and afterwards married his brother, the explorer W. Price Hunt.

Lucas-Hunt Road runs along the eastern border of Normandy, after Ann and her descendants. The family was a great patron of the Church, with many institutions locating on their property.


Incarnate Word

Former Incarnate Word Convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - entrance marker

Former Incarnate Word Convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior front

This is the former convent of the Congregation of the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word of San Antonio, Texas. This provincial house was founded in 1922, and is now the University Inn and Conference Center.

Former Incarnate Word Convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - cornerstone

CONGREGATIO SORORUM CARITATIS A VERBO INCARNATO SAN ANTONIO TEXAS
LAUDETUR VERBUM INCARNATUM 1928

Cornerstone of the building, seen from two angles. On the left is the symbol of the congregation; on the right "praised be the Word Incarnate".

Former Incarnate Word Convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior of chapel

The former chapel.

Incarnate Word Academy, in Bel-Nor, Missouri, USA - exterior

Incarnate Word Academy, a girl's high school, was founded in 1932 and remains open.

Incarnate Word Academy, in Bel-Nor, Missouri, USA - statue

Statue at the entrance to the school.


Daughters of Charity

Former Daughters of Charity convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior

This is the former Provincial House of the Daughters of Charity. This congregation was founded in Paris in 1633 by Saints Vincent de Paul and Louise de Marillac, and was dedicated to serving the poor. This building, now owned by the University of Missouri, retains the name "Provincial House".

Former Daughters of Charity convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - Marian medallion

Monogram of Mary as seen on the Miraculous Medal.

Cross on wall at former Daughters of Charity convent, Seton Center, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

Cross on the wall of Seton Center, named after Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, American Foundress of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph, who adopted the Rule of the French Daughters of Charity.

Cornerstone at former Daughters of Charity convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

Cornerstone of the Seton Center.

Former Daughters of Charity convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - small chapel exterior

Former Marillac College Chapel, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

This was undoubtably a chapel. Now a computer lab, this was once a part of Marillac College (1955-1974), a Sisters college dedicated for the education of nuns.

Former Marillac College Chapel, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - former sanctuary

Three steps up. The High Altar was here.

Former Daughters of Charity chapel, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior

Exterior of the Provincial House's chapel. Owned by the University, this is now a popular chapel for student weddings, and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is still offered here. Click here for photos of the interior of the chapel.

Empty Grotto at former Daughters of Charity convent, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

An empty grotto.

Daughters of Charity cemetery, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - chapel

Daughters of Charity cemetery.


Churches

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior

Saint Ann's Parish is venerable, dating from 1856.

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

Cornerstone.

SAINT ANN'S CHURCH DEDICATED BY
THE MOST REVEREND JOSEPH E. RITTER
ARCHBISHOP OF ST. LOUIS APRIL 27, 1952

FREDERICK J. SPRENKE PASTOR
JOSEPH DENIS MURPHY ARCHITECT


Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - sanctuary

Sanctuary.

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - First Station of the Cross, Jesus is condemned

First Station of the Cross — Jesus is condemned.

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - stained glass window

Stained glass window.

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - shrine to the Blessed Virgin Mary

Shrine to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Saint Ann's Roman Catholic Church, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - Saint Ann School

Saint Ann School.

Saint Paul Roman Catholic Church, in Northwoods, Missouri, USA

This is the former Ascension/Saint Paul parish, which closed in 2008. Ascension parish, founded in 1945, merged in 1995 with Saint Paul the Apostle parish (founded 1909) in Pine Lawn.

The demographics of the area has changed over the years, with far fewer Catholics now living here, although you can still see garden statues of Our Lady in this neighborhood.

Our Lady of Guadalupe Roman Catholic Church, in Ferguson, Missouri, USA - mosaic of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Mosaic, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, founded in 1954, in the nearby town of Ferguson.

Many thanks to Tina F., who alerted me to this area and generously drove me around to take photos.

Normandy, Missouri - the "Little Rome of the West", part 2

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF SAINT LOUIS is the mother diocese of what was the western half of the United States, and its intense missionary activity and Catholic leadership earned it the nickname "Rome of the West". But nowhere in the Archdiocese was there such a concentration of Catholic institutions as found in and around the north Saint Louis County town of Normandy, giving it the title of the "Little Rome of the West". This was the result of the generosity of Ann Lucas Hunt and her descendants, early settlers of this region.

Much of the area has subsequently been purchased by the University of Missouri - Saint Louis.

Click here for part 1 of this photo essay.

Site of Normandy Hospital, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

An empty field, once the site of a hospital, and soon to be the University's baseball field.

The photos in this and my previous photo essay were taken on two occasions: April 3rd 2009, a brilliant but cool day, and April 18th, a warm but rainy and dreary day.

The bleakness of the photo above, I think, is fitting, and is a symbol for the great loss of the Church in this area; for many of the photos in this and in my previous photo essay are of closed Catholic institutions. I am reminded of the ‘Northernness’ much beloved by 20th century writers C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien; which included the cold, bleak, severe landscapes of northern Europe and the Medieval literature of that region, which had a strong sense of loss and of longing, but also of courage.

Some say that as Christians, we are Resurrection people and ought not morn for what is lost; but this is mistaken. Even Christ's resurrected and glorified body bore the Wounds of His Passion and Death; for if He did not suffer during His Passion, then He did not offer for us a true sacrifice to His Father, we are still in our sins, and we have no hope for salvation. We are not pure spirits nor are we merely animals: we can mourn for the good things of our world now lost, even as we wait in joy for the New Jerusalem.

Building up an institution takes years, enormous effort, and great generosity: in other words, it requires virtue. Destruction can occur in a mere moment, which intensifies our sense of loss.

Former Passionist monastery, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - cornerstone 1967

1967

Cornerstone of the former Passionist Fathers' Retreat Center, now Bellerive Hall of the University of Missouri. 1967 was an excellent year for the Church: vocations were high, the laity was generous, and the reforms of the Second Vatican Council promised that the Reformation was over and the Church would grow tremendously.

Then came 1968 and the collapse.

Former Passionist monastery, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior of chapel

Exterior of the former Passionist chapel.

Former Franciscan chapel, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - exterior

Exterior of the chapel of a former Franciscan house, now the University's Music School. I looked into this former chapel; it is now a music practice room, and students, making up a string quartet, were making lovely music.

Former "Child Center of Our Lady", in Normandy, Missouri, USA

This is the former Child Center of Our Lady, now owned by the secular “Variety the Children's Charity of St. Louis”, popularly known as the Variety Club.

Sisters of the Good Shepherd Convent, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

Convent of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd, located by Saint Ann's Church.

Former Cardinal Newman College, now Fine Arts building at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

This is the former Cardinal Newman College, closed in 1985, which now houses the Fine Arts school of the University of Missouri. The artwork on the right is by Mark di Suvero, considered to be the greatest of the abstract expressionist sculptors, but who fell away from the True and Holy Catholic Faith of his childhood.

Observatory, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

The University's Richard D. Schwartz Observatory is now on the grounds of that former school.

Mother of Good Counsel Home, in Northwoods, Missouri, USA

Mother of Good Counsel Home, a nursing home, in the adjacent town of Northwoods. It is operated by the Sisters of Saint Francis of the Martyr Saint George of Alton, Illinois.

Saint Vincent Home for Children, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

The Saint Vincent Home for Children, a residential treatment center for abused and neglected children, now receives half its funding from the State of Missouri.

Saint Vincent Home for Children, in Normandy, Missouri, USA - "The German St. Vincent Orphan Home"

THE GERMAN ST. VINCENT ORPHAN HOME

Founded in 1850 after the great Saint Louis fire and cholera epidemic, which left many children orphans. The orphanage was operated from 1851 by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet, and from 1888 by the Sisters of Christian Charity, and now apparently is governed by a lay board. This present building dates from 1917.

Former Saint Vincent's Hospital, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

The former Saint Vincent's Hospital treated mental disorders. Founded in 1858 in downtown Saint Louis, it was operated by the Daughters of Charity. This building dates from 1891, and it closed in the 1980s. It is now used as an apartment building and nursing home.

Mullanphy-Hardy-Wayside House, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

The Mullanphy-Hardy-Wayside house in Normandy was built by John Mullanphy in 1893.

Gate to the Village of Pasadena Hills, Missouri, USA

Many charming neighborhoods remain in the area. Here is the gate to the Village of Pasadena Hills.

Glass pyramid over the Mercantile Library, at the University of Missouri - Saint Louis, in Normandy, Missouri, USA

This glass pyramid covers the remarkable Mercantile Library, originally founded in 1846, which houses a collection of early primary documents of the westward expansion of the United States and the commercial history of Saint Louis, including the river trade and railroads. The Mercantile is located alongside the University's main library.

As I read more history of this area, I find many Catholic institutions of this area that are now gone, such as the landmark Mount Providence School and Motherhouse of the Sisters of Divine Providence, destroyed in 2001. Also, there are other Catholic sites in the area, former and present, which I either neglected to visit, or am unaware of their locations.

Many thanks to Tina F. who alerted me to this area and who graciously drove me around for hours for some of this photography.