Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Photo of Saint Francis de Sales Oratory

Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - back of church at sunset

A very low camera angle, behind the church, with the moon at the upper right. Photo taken at sunset, after the Solemn High Mass for the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul.

Monday, June 29, 2009

Photo of Saint Francis Xavier Church

Saint Francis Xavier Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - exterior front

On the campus of Saint Louis University.

Book Review

A BOOK REVIEW from the West End Word — a newspaper for the Central West End neighborhood of Saint Louis, Missouri:
“Catholic St. Louis contains the beautiful photographs you expect in a pictorial history. But Abeln’s detailed images and his fresh perspective invite readers to notice things easily overlooked. Whether it is the pelican on the altar rail in All Souls or the Gateway Arch in a stained glass window at St. Raymond’s Cathedral, Abeln shows us something new. Photographs are taken at different times of day in different seasons with different lighting. They illustrate the various forms of beauty found inside and outside the churches....

“In both the introduction and the profiles of the individual churches, Faherty shares some of the St. Louis history he has studied for many years. At 94, Faherty adds to the dozens of books he has written. His subjects include Henry Shaw, the Missouri Botanical Garden and the St. Louis Cathedral Basilica. He has also written novels, a book about NASA and histories of St. Louis Irish and German Catholics. Faherty has contributed much to local history and is widely admired for his unflagging energy, curiosity and wealth of knowledge.”
Click for full review, written by Jennifer Alexander.

Quo Vadis?

On the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul.

From the Acts of Peter and Paul, an early document; though not canonical, it contains Church tradition:
Then Nero, having summoned Agrippa the proprætor, said to him: It is necessary that men introducing mischievous religious observances should die. Wherefore I order them to take iron clubs, and to be killed in the sea-fight. Agrippa the proprætor said: Most sacred emperor, what you have ordered is not fitting for these men, since Paul seems innocent beside Peter. Nero said: By what fate, then, shall they die? Agrippa answered and said: As seems to me, it is just that Paul's head should be cut off, and that Peter should be raised on a cross as the cause of the murder. Nero said: You have most excellently judged.

Then both Peter and Paul were led away from the presence of Nero. And Paul was beheaded on the Ostesian road.
And Peter, having come to the cross, said: Since my Lord Jesus Christ, who came down from the heaven upon the earth, was raised upon the cross upright, and He has deigned to call to heaven me, who am of the earth, my cross ought to be fixed head down most, so as to direct my feet towards heaven; for I am not worthy to be crucified like my Lord. Then, having reversed the cross, they nailed his feet up.

And the multitude was assembled reviling Cæsar, and wishing to kill him. But Peter restrained them, saying: A few days ago, being exhorted by the brethren, I was going away; and my Lord Jesus Christ met me, and having adored Him, I said, Lord, whither are You going? And He said to me, I am going to Rome to be crucified. And I said to Him, Lord, were You not crucified once for all? And the Lord answering, said, I saw you fleeing from death, and I wish to be crucified instead of you. And I said, Lord, I go; I fulfil Your command. And He said to me, Fear not, for I am with you. On this account, then, children, do not hinder my going; for already my feet are going on the road to heaven. Do not grieve, therefore, but rather rejoice with me, for today I receive the fruit of my labours. And thus speaking, he said: I thank You, good Shepherd, that the sheep which You have entrusted to me, sympathize with me; I ask, then, that with me they may have a part in Your kingdom. And having thus spoken, he gave up the ghost.

And immediately there appeared men glorious and strange in appearance; and they said: We are here, on account of the holy and chief apostles, from Jerusalem. And they, along with Marcellus, an illustrious man, who, having left Simon, had believed in Peter, took up his body secretly, and put it under the terebinth near the place for the exhibition of sea-fights in the place called the Vatican...

And the consummation of the holy glorious Apostles Peter and Paul was on the 29th of the month of June— in Christ Jesus our Lord, to whom be glory and strength.

Saturday, June 27, 2009

"Happiness is love"

SEE THE ARTICLEWhat Makes Us Happy?” in the June 2009 online issue of The Atlantic. From the article:
Is there a formula—some mix of love, work, and psychological adaptation—for a good life? For 72 years, researchers at Harvard have been examining this question, following 268 men who entered college in the late 1930s through war, career, marriage and divorce, parenthood and grandparenthood, and old age.
With little doubt, modern psychology, and medicine in general, has made tremendous gains with diagnosing and helping pathology. But modern science has far less success with characterizing healthy individuals; psychology has hardly made any advancement in this since the time of Plato. This isn't surprising; empirical science which does not believe in anything that cannot be measured with an instrument can hardly be trusted to judge persons who do not display pathology. And so the Harvard study often seems to have become burdened with the various fashionable psychologically theories of the past century; but wisdom comes with age, and the researchers have rediscovered old truths, long known and yet long ignored.

Philosophers have stated that a good, flourishing, well-lived life is a happy life. Happiness is an end in itself — we don't want to be happy to get anything else, and we strive for things that will make us happy.

But what is happiness?

Since we are animals, there is a certain kind of contentment that is happiness: a life without much stress, with pleasure, with stability and general freedom from want. Hedonists think that pleasure is happiness, and our society filled with drugs, sex, and entertainment is hedonistic indeed. But the study quoted above shows that people who seek happiness in these kinds of pleasures are the least happy of all!

Since our nature is also spiritual, there is a kind of permanent happiness that is better called blessedness. Beatitude is associated with personal virtue, but not just the moral or intellectual virtues, but rather the theological virtues of faith, hope, and love. Clearly, a virtuous life can lead to what the world thinks will make someone happy, such as riches and fame, but rather Catholic moral theology teaches that these are burdens and responsibilities for which we may be rather harshly judged.

The study shows that money does not make someone happy, nor does pleasure, nor does power, nor success and fame, even though these form the core of our contemporary political, economic, and educational systems. Rather, consider instead these things which the study says help lead to happiness:
  • Leisure and joy
  • Humility
  • Love for others
Consider also Christ's beatitudes. Prof. Peter Kreeft has a good lecture on these: click here.

You may want to view the video, which is on the same page linked to at the top. In it, the Harvard researcher states that happiness is ultimately found in love. This should not surprise us: read Pope Benedict's encyclical Deus Caritas Est.

Friday, June 26, 2009

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Photos of Saint Joseph Church, in Freeburg, Illinois

HERE ARE PHOTOS of Saint Joseph Church, in the village of Freeburg, Illinois. The church is located in the Diocese of Belleville, 23 road miles southeast of downtown Saint Louis, Missouri, in rural Saint Clair County. I took these photos on June 20th, 2009.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - exterior

The church was founded in 1857. According to a sesquicentennial history of the church:
Many Catholics began to arrive in this area in the year 1800. Settlements began in the Silver Creek, Turkey Hill and Twelve Mile Prairie areas (all surrounding Freeburg). Between 1830-1840, the Catholic population was growing at a surprising rate, with missions being laid out throughout the county.
Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - nave

The early faithful here were served by circuit-riding missionary priests. Continuing the history:
In the early 1850’s, the Freeburg Catholics began their quest to have the Diocese establish their mission as an official parish. Freeburg was under the reign of the Diocese of Quincy at this time. It would take several years and many written requests to the bishop to achieve this task and finally in 1857, word was received that the Catholic mission at Freeburg would be known as a parish. It would be called St. Joseph Parish.

Fr. Francis Bloesinger, a Circuit Rider from the diocese began to make frequent stops here, and celebrate mass in the newly acquired property of Adam Stephan, which was converted into a small meeting place for services. This property was a log home and was located on the corner of Alton and St. Clair Streets, where the present church stands today. The first recorded baptism is Jacob Reichert on December 9, 1857.
Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - sanctuary

The present church was built in 1911-1912, from plans by architect Victor Klutho, who also designed Saint Francis de Sales Church in Saint Louis, as well as many other magnificent ecclesial structures.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - tabernacle

The tabernacle.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Mary's altar, showing her crushing the head of the serpent.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - ceiling medallion of Saint Matthew

One of the ceiling medallions, this one showing Saint Matthew.

The village of Freeburg is named after the city of Freiburg in Germany, the former home of many early villagers. According to a village history:
The big German migrations to this area started around 1830 and continued quite strong for the rest of the century. Obviously, the abundance of coal, the availability of cheap fertile farm land, as well as the proximity to the frontier city of St. Louis, only 20 miles to the northwest, are what attracted settlers to Freeburg.
The village is on the vast Illinois prairie, and overlies coal seams; mining was at one time an important industry here.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - stained glass window

The parish school was operated by the Adorers of the Most Precious Blood and the School Sisters of Notre Dame. A listing of Sisters and clergy laboring at this church is found here.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - stained glass window of the Agony in the Garden

Stained glass window of the Agony in the Garden. The apostles sleep.

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - purple stained glass window

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Freeburg, Illinois, USA - sign

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Standing Room Only

Crowd at the Saint Louis County Library, Headquarters Branch, in Ladue, Missouri, USA - book signing for "Catholic St. Louis: A Pictorial History"

A happy crowd looks forward to meeting Fr. Faherty, author of the book "Catholic St. Louis: A Pictorial History".

Thanks to everyone who stopped by the library!

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Book Signing Reminder

Click image for larger version.
Father William Barnaby Faherty and Photographer Mark Abeln discuss “Catholic St. Louis”
The St. Louis County Library Foundation is pleased to present author William Barnaby Faherty, S.J. and photographer Mark Abeln for a discussion and signing of “Catholic St. Louis.”
The program is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase at the event from the Reedy Press.
The event will be held on Thursday, June 25th, 2:00 p.m. at the Saint Louis County Library Headquarters, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Ladue, Missouri.

Click here for other upcoming events.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Flowers from My Sister-in-Law's Garden

I HOPE YOU ENJOY these photos of flowers, from my sister-in-law's garden, taken last Sunday.

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Monday, June 22, 2009

Photos of Saint Michael's Church, in Paderborn, Illinois

HERE ARE PHOTOS of Saint Michael's Church, in Paderborn, Illinois. A part of the Diocese of Belleville, this lovely church is located in rural Saint Clair County, about 24 road miles south-by-southeast of downtown Saint Louis, Missouri, and about 7 miles east of the nearest large town, Waterloo.

Saint Michael's Roman Catholic Church, in Paderborn, Illinois, USA - exterior

The church's patron is Saint Michael the Archangel.

Saint Michael's Roman Catholic Church, in Paderborn, Illinois, USA - nave

The village of Paderborn is named after the city in Germany. Many early priests in the diocese came from Paderborn, which is famous for its veneration of Saint Liborius, bishop (died a.d. 390). 25 road miles east of here, in Saint Libory, is a Saint Liborius Chuch.

Saint Michael's Roman Catholic Church, in Paderborn, Illinois, USA - sign

This church dates from 1843, the same year that this territory was transferred from the Diocese of Saint Louis to the newly-erected Diocese of Chicago.

Address:
4576 Buss Branch Road
Waterloo, Illinois 62298
Purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea

Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea), found in my sister-in-law's garden. This is a common wildflower, native to the midwestern and southeastern United States.

Book Review

FROM THE Saint Louis Post-Dispatch:
...Faherty, 94, is comfortably at home with the strong ecclesiastical personalities who built their part of this area in the 19th and early 20th centuries. He discusses them with familiarity and definite opinions, and sets out their deeds in the context of their times...

Abeln has an eye for beauty, and profound familiarity with ecclesiastical detail. He finds new focus even in familiar buildings (the New Cathedral) and made me want to visit more of the unfamiliar.

This is a lovely book that should please any fan of local history or church architecture.
Click for full review, written by Sarah Bryan Miller, Classical music critic for the newspaper.





Sunday, June 21, 2009

Happy Fathers Day

1 The sons of wisdom are the church of the just: and their generation, obedience and love.
2 Children, hear the judgment of your father, and so do that you may be saved.
3 For God hath made the father honourable to the children: and seeking the judgment of the mothers, hath confirmed it upon the children.
4 He that loveth God, shall obtain pardon for his sins by prayer, and shall refrain himself from them, and shall be heard in the prayer of days.
5 And he that honoureth his mother is as one that layeth up a treasure.
6 He that honoureth his father shall have joy in his own children, and in the day of his prayer he shall be heard.
7 He that honoureth his father shall enjoy a long life: and he that obeyeth the father, shall be a comfort to his mother.
8 He that feareth the Lord, honoureth his parents, and will serve them as his masters that brought him into the world.
9 Honour thy father, in work and word, and all patience,
10 That a blessing may come upon thee from him, and his blessing may remain in the latter end.
11 The father's blessing establisheth the houses of the children: but the mother's curse rooteth up the foundation.
12 Glory not in the dishonour of thy father: for his shame is no glory to thee.
13 For the glory of a man is from the honour of his father, and a father without honour is the disgrace of the son.
14 Son, support the old age of thy father, and grieve him not in his life;
15 And if his understanding fail, have patience with him, and despise him not when thou art in thy strength: for the relieving of the father shall not be forgotten.
16 For good shall be repaid to thee for the sin of thy mother.
17 And in justice thou shalt be built up, and in the day of affliction thou shalt be remembered: and thy sins shall melt away as the ice in the fair warm weather.
18 Of what an evil fame is he that forsaketh his father: and he is cursed of God that angereth his mother.
Sirach 3:1-18

Friday, June 19, 2009

Eat Your Veggies

THESE LUSCIOUS VEGETABLES were taken Monday evening at the Missouri Botanical Garden in Saint Louis, Missouri.

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Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church, in Bonne Terre, Missouri, USA - statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus 2

Statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, in Bonne Terre, Missouri. Photo taken January, 2008.

This is the feast day of the love of God for us, which is wounded by our sins, as much Old Testament imagery reminds us. As the heart is figuratively the seat of love, so the Sacred Heart of Jesus, pierced by the lance, shows us our unfaithfulness.
“O God, who in the Heart of Thy Son, wounded by our sins, dost mercifully vouchsafe to bestow upon us the boundless treasures of Thy love: grant, we beseech Thee, that we who now render Him the service of our devotion and piety, may also fulfill our duty of worthy satisfaction.”

— Collect of the missa 'Cogitationes Cordis'

Year of Priests

Pope Benedict XVI proclaimed a Year of Priests, starting today, the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Click here for a prayer card. Click for more information from the USCCB.
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Flowers, at the Missouri Botanical Garden, taken on Monday. That day was the 150th anniversary of the garden opening to the public.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

“The Pilgrim”

Statue of Saint Ignatius Loyola ("The Pilgrim" by Vicki Reid), at Saint Louis University, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

This statue of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, entitled “The Pilgrim”, is by artist Vicki Reid, and is installed at Saint Louis University.

Mushroom

Mushroom

This mushroom, about 3-¾ of an inch across, apparently sprouted in my yard overnight. This, and other mushrooms on my lawn today have an unusual concave cup; usually, they have the more typical rounded convex cup.

Upcoming Book Signings

Click image for larger version.
Father William Barnaby Faherty and Photographer Mark Abeln discuss “Catholic St. Louis”
The St. Louis County Library Foundation is pleased to present author William Barnaby Faherty, S.J. and photographer Mark Abeln for a discussion and signing of “Catholic St. Louis.”
The program is free and open to the public. Books will be available for purchase at the event from the Reedy Press.
The event will be held on Thursday, June 25th, 2:00 p.m. at the Saint Louis County Library Headquarters, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard, Ladue, Missouri.

Other upcoming events:

Borders Bookstore in Sunset Hills, Missouri.
July 22nd, 7:00 p.m. Mark Abeln
Click for map.

Missouri History Museum in Forest Park - Lee Auditorium
Sunday, August 23rd, 2:00 p.m. Fr. Faherty and Mark Abeln.
Click for map.

Saint Peter's Church, in Saint Charles, Missouri.
Saturday and Sunday, September 12th and 13th, after each Mass. Mark Abeln.
Click for map.

Washington Missouri Public Library
Thursday, October 15th, 7:00 p.m. Mark Abeln.
More events are planned, and I will let you know here when dates and times are determined.

Upcoming reviews of the book will be found in the Saint Louis Post Dispatch, this Sunday's edition, and the Alton Telegraph.

Be on the lookout for gallery and art fair exhibits of my photos - more information later.



I am available for public speaking, presentations, and book signings.

My current speaking topics include:
  • What is Art? What is Beauty? Classical philosophical answers to these questions.
  • Art and the Church. A theological approach to the arts in the Catholic Church.
  • A Photographic Tour of some Saint Louis Catholic Churches.
  • A Photographic Tour of some Saint Louis Neighborhoods.
  • Problems in Digital Photography and Some Solutions. A highly technical talk on digital photography.
Please contact me or Reedy Press to schedule a presentation.

(A portion of the proceeds of the book signings are donated to the event sponsor).

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Photos of Corpus Christi Processions

THE GREAT FEAST of Corpus Christi is distinctively marked by a liturgical procession. In contradiction to the modern political ideology that ‘religion is a private matter’ the Church in her wisdom makes this feast of the Eucharist a public celebration.

Here are photos I took this year on this feast. These photos are of somewhat poor quality, and lacking decent audio recording, I cannot represent the hymns, prayers, and litanies sung along these routes. There is nothing like participating yourself!

Sacred Heart in Florissant

Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - procession 5

Saint Thomas Aquinas, the ‘Angelic Doctor’ and my patron, wrote the liturgical texts of this feast, including this sequence in the Latin liturgy, quoted here:
Lauda, Sion, Salvatorem,
Lauda ducem et pastorem,
In hymnis et canticis.


Sion, lift thy voice and sing:
Praise thy Savior and thy King,
Praise with hymns thy Shepherd true.
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - procession 3
Quantum potes, tantum aude;
Quia major omni laude,
Nec laudare sufficis.


All thou canst, do thou endeavor,
Yet thy praise can equal never
Such as merits thy great King.
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - procession 4
A Knight of Columbus stands guard over the procession. This is one of the few reminders of the old kind of formality found in Catholic culture, where laymen would wear distinctive (and typically colorful) dress for formal religious occasions, where each uniform indicated membership in a particular confraternity, sodality, or guild.
Laudis thema specialis,
Panis vivus et vitalis,
Hodie proponitur.


See today before us laid
The living and life-giving Bread!
Theme for praise and joy profound!
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - procession
Quem in sacrae mensa coenae,
Turbae fratrum duodenae,
Datum non ambigitur.


The same which at the sacred board
Was, by our incarnate Lord,
Giv'n to His Apostels round.
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - procession 2
Sit laus plena, sit sonora;
Sit jucunda, sit decora
Mentis jubilatio.


Let the praise by loud and high:
Sweet and tranquil be the joy
Felt today in every breast,
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - processional altar
A temporary altar along the route, used for benediction.
Dies enim solemnis agitur,
In qua mensae prima recolitur
Hujus institutio.


On this festival divine
Which records the origin
Of the glorious Eucharist.
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - devotional shrine along route 2
Some homeowners along the procession route installed little shrines in their yards.
In hac mensa novi Regis,
Novum Pasha novae legis
Phase vetus terminat.


On this table of the King,
Our new Paschal offering
Brings to end the olden rite.
Corpus Christi Procession at Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - devotional shrine along route
Vetustatem novitas,
umbram fugat veritas,
Noctem lux eliminat.


Here, for empty shadows fled,
Is reality instead;
Here, instead of darkness, light.
Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, in Florissant, Missouri, USA - exterior from back
Sacred Heart Church.
Quod in coena Christus gessit,
Faciendum hoc espressit
In sui memoriam.


His own act, at supper seated,
Christ ordain'd to be repeated,
In His memory divine;
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory

Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - start of Corpus Christi procession in church 2
Docti sacris institutis,
Panem, vinum, in salutis
Consecramus hostiam.


Wherefore now, with adoration,
We, the Host of our salvation,
Consecrate from bread and wine,
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 2
Christ in the City. The procession goes through an industrial area.
Dogma datur Christianis,
Quod in carnem transit panis,
Et vinum in sanguinem.


Hear what holy Church maintaineth,
That the bread its substance changeth
Into Flesh, the wine to Blood.
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 1
Quod non capis, quod non vides,
Animosa firmat fides,
Praeter rerum ordinem.


Doth it pass thy comprehending?
Faith, the law of sight transcending
Leaps to things not understood,
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 3
Canon Wiener holds the monstrance, shaded by a baldachin, or canopy.
Sub diversis speciebus,
Signis tantum, et non rebus,
Latent res eximiae.


Here beneath these signs are hidden
Priceless things, to sense forbidden
Signs, not things, are all we see.
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 5
Procession returning to Saint Francis de Sales Oratory.
Caro cibus, sanguis potus;
Manet tamen Christus totus
Sub utraque specie.


Flesh from bread, and Blood from wine,
Yet is Christ in either sign,
All entire, confessed to be.
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 4
A sumente non concisus,
Non confractus, non divisus,
Integer accipitur.


They, who of Him here partake,
Sever not, nor rend, nor break:
But, entire, their Lord receive,
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 6
Altar of benediction.
Sumit unus, sumunt mille:
Quantum isti, tantum ille:
Nec sumptus consumitur.


Whether one or thousands eat,
All receive the self-same meat,
Nor the less for others leave,
Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - end of Corpus Christi procession in church
Sumunt boni, sumunt mali,
Sorte tamen inaequali
Vitae vel interitus.


Both the wicked and the good
Eat of this celestial Food;
But with ends how opposite!
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 1
Mors et malis, vita bonis:
Vide paris sumptionis
Quam sit dispar exitus.


Here 'tis life: and there 'tis death:
The same, yet issuing to each
In a difference infinite.
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 2
Fracto demum sacramento,
Ne vacilles, sed memento
Tantum esse sub fragmento
Quantum toto tegitur.


Nor a single doubt retain,
When they break the Host in twain,
But that in each part remains
What was in the whole before;
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 3
Nulla rei fit scissura:
Signi tantum fit fractura:
Qua nec status nec statura
Signati minuitur.


Since the simple sign alone
Suffers change in state or form,
The signified remaining one
And the same for evermore.
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 4
Procession approaches the Archbishop's mansion.
Ecce panis Angelorum,
Factus cibus viatorum,
Vere panis filiorum.
Non mittendus canibus.


Lo! upon the altar lies,
Hidden deep from human eyes,
Bread of Angels from the skies,
Made the food of mortal man;
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 5 (Our Lady of Guadelupe altar)
Altar of benediction in honor of the Virgin Mary, under her title of Our Lady of Guadeloupe.
In figuris praesignatur,
Cum Isaac immolatur:
Agnus paschae deputatur;
Datur manna patribus.


Children's meat to dogs denied,
In old types presignified:
In the manna heaven-supplied
In Isaac, and the Paschal lamb.
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 6 (Saint John Vianney altar)
Altar of benediction in honor of Saint John Vianney.
Bone pastor, panis vere,
Jesu, nostri miserere:
Tu nos pasce, nos tuere,
Tu nos bona fac videre
In terra viventium.


Jesu! Shepherd of the sheep!
Thou Thy flock in safety keep,
Living Bread! Thy life supply:
Strengthen us, or else we die:
Fill us with celestial grace!
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 7 (Sacred Heart altar)
Archbishop Carlson praying before the monstrance, on the Sacred Heart of Jesus altar.
Tu, qui cuncta scis et vales,
Qui nos pascis hic mortales,
Tuos ibi commensales,
Cohaeredes et sodales,
Fac Sanctorum civium.


Thou, who feedest us below!
Source of all we have or know!
Grant that with Thy Saints above,
Sitting at the feast of love,
We may see Thee face to face.

Amen. Alleluia.
Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Corpus Christi procession 8 (candlelight procession inside the Cathedral)
The procession, by candlelight, reenters the Cathedral Basilica.

In other times and in other places, the Catholic tradition of public processions is more highly developed; indeed it seems that elaborate processions are found in nearly all cultures throughout history. Religious processions were largely banned by the various Protestant denominations, and so public processions in the United States — parades — are secular in character, even notably many Saint Patrick's Day parades.