Sunday, September 02, 2007

Photos of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri

In August, 2007, I revisited the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in downtown Saint Louis, Missouri. This church is known locally as the "Old Cathedral". For more information, see this older post on the church.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - exterior

The church is limestone with a sandstone facade; this stone was quarried locally. The parish dates from 1770, while this particular church is from 1834; the first church on this site was a log cabin.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - nave

The interior was redecorated in the 1960s. This church never had stained glass windows, and the light color scheme makes this a bright church. It is probably the most popular church in the area for weddings.

The young couple sitting in the pew in this photo are blurred due to long exposure time.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - crucifixion painting

The crucifixion painting is a copy of an original by Diego Velázquez.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - tabernacle

The tabernacle.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - cathedra

The old bishop's cathedra.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Our Lady of America

During August 2007, the new statue of Our Lady of America was temporarily at this church.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Detail of Our Lady of America

Detail of Our Lady of America.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Statue of Saint Joseph and the Infant Jesus

Statue of Saint Joseph and the Infant Jesus.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - statue of Saint Joan of Arc

To the left of the main altar is a statue of Saint Joan of Arc (1412-1431), patroness of France.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - statue of Saint Louis IX, King of France

To the right of the main altar is a statue of Saint Louis IX, King of France (1215-1270), patron of the Archdiocese, the City, and this church.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Infant Jesus

Statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Infant Jesus.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Crucifix

Crucifix on Mary's altar.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - side of nave

A view to the side of nave; buildings of downtown Saint Louis are visible through the windows.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Saint Margaret Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Saint Margaret Mary (1647-1690) and the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Saint Thérèse of Lisieux and Our Lady of Fatima

Saint Thérèse of Lisieux (1873- 1897) and Our Lady of Fatima.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Station of the Cross

The VIIIth Station of the Cross: the daughters of Jerusalem weep over Jesus.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Saint Anthony of Padua

Saint Anthony of Padua (1195-1231).

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Crucifix

Crucifix and Infant Jesus of Prague.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Saint Bernadette (1844-1879) and Our Lady of Lourdes

Saint Bernadette (1844-1879) and Our Lady of Lourdes.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - baptismal font

The baptismal font.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - tintinabulum

This bell, called a tintinabulum, shows this church to be a minor basilica. This honor is granted by the Pope, and we see here the Papal tiara and Keys of Peter.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - ombrellino

The ombrellino, or umbrella, is the other symbol of a basilica, in the (faded) Vatican colors of red and gold. The Gateway Arch is visible through the window; below is a confessional.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - ombrellino detail

Detail of the ombrellino.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - pipe organ and choir loft

The pipe organ and choir loft.

Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - pew detail

At one time, pews were rented out.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - tomb and cathedra of Bishop Joseph Rosati

Under the church is the tomb of Bishop Joseph Rosati (1789-1843), with his cathedra in front.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - nativity scene

A museum and gift shop are attached to the Basilica. Here is a nativity scene from the 15th century.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - crucifix

An old crucifix.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - Instruments of the Passion and Death of Jesus

The Instruments of the Passion and Death of Jesus.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - missal

A missal, opened to the liturgy for Holy Saturday.

Museum of the Basilica of Saint Louis, King of France, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - bullet holes

This fragment of metal shows bullet holes from an attempt by the Know-Nothings to burn down the church. An Irish veteran of the Battle of Waterloo successfully held off the mob with a small cannon.

2 comments:

  1. Thanks so much Mark. Who were the "Know-Nothings"?

    - Bryan

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  2. The "Know-Nothings" was a secretive, nativist, anti-Catholic organization, mainly made up of middle-class Protestants, which was prominent before the Civil War. They were primarily against the flood of Irish Catholics fleeing the Potato Famine of the 1840s.

    The Know-Nothings later broke up because of deep divisions within the party over slavery.

    ReplyDelete