Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Forest Park at Sunset

FOREST PARK, in Saint Louis, Missouri, at 1,371 acres, is the largest park in the City, and it is one of the earliest, and dating from 1876.

The park was founded not too long after the decisive victory of the North in the American Civil War; as this victory was apparently won by mass-produced weapons rather than by courage, so it was believed that strong manufacturing was essential for the future security and growth of the Republic. This meant that the cities were to grow to immense size. The often ugly and squalid conditions found in big cities led to the development of large public parks, which offer a retreat from urban noise, crowds, and pollution.

See the companion article Forest Park at Sunrise.

River, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Forest Park is home to the zoo, and the art and history museums, as well as golf courses and ball fields, but here I will concentrate my photos on the watercourses that snake through the park. Once the valley of the River des Peres, these picturesque waterways are artificially maintained via pumped water, while the actual river runs through concrete tubes underground.

River 2, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

These photos were taken around sunset, about a week ago.

I fixed the white balance of the camera to ‘daylight’, so that my viewers can get some idea of the changing color of light as the day waned. Also, I used an antique fixed-focal length lens, so all these photos have similar perspective and compression of distance.

River 3, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The Park Plaza Apartments, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - view from Forest Park,

The Park Plaza. The east and west sides of the park are lined with tall buildings.

Hospital, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - view from Forest Park,

A hospital.

Fountain, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

A fountain, in the middle of Round Lake.

River 4, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Forest Parkway, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The Forest Parkway runs through the park.

River 5, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Suspension bridge, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

A suspension bridge. This is one of my favorite photos from that evening. Where are Monet and his water lilies?

World's Fair Pavilion, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

World's Fair Pavilion.

Paddleboats, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Paddleboaters enjoy the evening. These are available for rent at the Boathouse. However, consider renting a rowboat instead; the paddleboats are very uncomfortable to paddle if you are tall or heavy.

Suspension bridge 2, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Paddleboats 2, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

More paddleboaters.

River 6, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Waterfall, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

A constructed waterfall.

Waterfall 2, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Yellow flowers, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Is this goldenrod?

Paddleboats 3, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

More boats in the Grand Basin. In the background is the large lawn of Art Hill, used in Winter for sledding: hay bales are placed along the lake edge to stop out-of-control sleds from plunging into the lake.

Art Museum, in Forest Park, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Art Hill rises up to the Saint Louis Art Museum. In front is a statue of Saint Louis IX, King of France.

Also see my article Forest Park at Sunrise.

2 comments:

  1. Which lens were you using, might I ask? Seems like 35mm or 50mm... but I can't be sure.

    Also, I do think that's goldenrod you captured in the middle of this series.

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  2. Goldenrod it is; a common garden ornamental. You may have been wondering because of the plant's reputation as an inducer of hay fever: but contrary to common perception, goldenrod is usually not responsible; the pollen is too heavy to stay airborne long, unlike the simultaneously flourishing ragweed, with much finer pollen. Goldenrod is showier though, so gets the blame.

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