Wednesday, March 08, 2006

Photos of All Saints Church, Saint Peter's Missouri

All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
All Saints Church, in the fast-growing town of Saint Peter's Missouri, in Saint Charles County. It is located about thirty highway miles northwest of downtown Saint Louis.

The church is sited on one of the highest points in Saint Charles County, and can be seen from miles around. It overlooks Interstate 70 and the floodplain of the Mississippi River.

The parish was founded in 1823 and includes a churchyard and school.

According to the archdiocesean web site, this parish has six Sunday morning masses (including one in the gymnasium), which must be a record for the archdiocese.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
A view to the altar.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
The main altar, decorated for Lent.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
The tabernacle.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
The lectern. The evangelists and Our Lord as the Good Shepherd are depicted.

Or is this an ambo? Pulpit? I'm not sure what to call these anymore.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
Altar of the Blessed Virgin Mary.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
Altar of Saint Joseph. This church lacks a narthex, so a fundraising table is here, next to the main entrance from the parking lot.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
The beautifully designed and decorated ceiling.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
A view from the choir loft.


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
A Station of the Cross. "Jesus meets the holy Women."


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
Statue of Saint Rita of Cascia, patroness of desperate causes. This is in the back of the church, next to the confessionals (which I nelglected to photograph, although they are photoworthy).


All Saints Church, in Saint Peters, Missouri, USA -
One of the stained glass windows.


Parish web site: http://www.allsaints-stpeters.org

Archdiocesan web site: http://www.archstl.org/parishes/362.shtml

Address:

7 McMenamy Road
Saint Peters, M0 63376

10 comments:

  1. Salve, Marcus Scotus.

    Nice pictures. Odd, I just recently had someone point out your blog to me this week. It seems we're on similar tracks in St. Louis and Kansas City. Do visit the Cave and take a look at some of the architecture that's been abandoned in Kansas City, Missouri, as well as some that is still open (for the moment) in Kansas City, Kansas.

    There is a qualitative difference between most of the churches you're featuring and most of the churches I've featured. In St. Louis, I think the churches are more natural to their surroundings, and are also an organic development of style, whereas in KC it seems we're just copying something or other. Perhaps it's better architects. Perhaps it's better taste in the chancery (or WAS better taste in the chancery). Perhaps it's the fact that the St. Louis area was developed about forty or fifty years ahead of KC. I don't know.

    One suggestion, though. I think an index to your churches, in the sidebar, would be great.

    --Curmudgeon.
    www.curmudgeonkc.blogspot.com

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  2. Hey,

    Why don't you have any pictures of churches in Georgia on here?

    Maureen

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  3. Marcus, et al.

    Good thing that you have taken those pictures now. I used to be a parishioner at All Saints (before moving to the city of St. Louis) and they're underway with a new church building plans and 'renovation' of the exisitng "worship space." I would be willing to bet that the high & side altars will disappear as well as the communion rail.

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  4. Maureen,

    I've been to Georgia many times, and I can't recall ever seeing a Catholic church there!

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  5. Marc,

    It's a shame about All Saints. So many people move out to St. Charles in order to have a nice, safe place to raise their children. I suspect that a more traditional church, liturgy, and catechesis would meet the needs of these famililes much better.

    The new style of "doing church" has an ambiguous morality which can lead to problems that parents would rather avoid.

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  6. Of the documents used in the embryonic planning of the new church build and renovation of existing church were, "Environment & Art in the Catholic Church" (I think that's the title). That was the unapproved USCCB committee document written into the 1970s GIRM. Another document that was studied and discussed was, His Eminence Roger Cardinal Mahony's "Gather Faithfully Together." Need I say more?

    Of the churches you have shown recently from St. Charles area, St. Peter probably fits the bill as what will probably remain the most traditional (relatively) building in eastern St. Charles County. St. Charles Borromeo, which I have been in many times as well, would probably hold that honor had they not wreck-o-vated it and placed the priest's chair in the center of everything and placed Our Lord off to the side. The stained glass inside St. Charles Borromeo is beautiful, and it appears that they kept it, but in the wreck-o-vation, they built a gathering area in the back of church, but didn't move the stations of the cross inside the main part of the church. It looks silly.

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  7. Marc,

    When you mention "Environment & Art in the Catholic Church", are you refering to the Saint Charles Borromeo renovation, or to the planned All Saints renovation? If the latter, then there actually is an approved newer document from the USCCB, "Built of Living Stones". Of course, our Archbishop can approve of any design he wants.

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  8. I was referring to the planned All Saints renovation. (I don't know anything about the St. Charles B. rennovation)

    We also looked at "Built of Living Stones," as well. Neither are really good promoters of traditional church design and have weak language (ie: can/may vs. shall/must). Leaves lots of room for nonsense if you ask me.

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  9. Nice touch?? by the HVAC contractor who put vents on either side of the main alter how imaginative!

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  10. As of July 2013 I can report that beautiful All Saints is standing tall and as magnificent as ever. At some point they took out the communion railing but overall it is still as glorious as ever. When this was built St.peters was but a small rural community and yet look at the incredible church that they built. it is every bit as large as the great churches found in St. Louis.

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