Saturday, March 31, 2007

"Holy Week liturgies scheduled at New, Old Cathedrals"

FROM THE ARTICLE Holy Week liturgies scheduled at New, Old Cathedrals, from the St. Louis Review:
Palm Sunday, April 1

Cathedral Basilica — Vigil Mass, 5 p.m. Saturday, March 31; Sunday Masses at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. (to be celebrated by Archbishop Burke), noon and 5 p.m. Old Cathedral — Vigil Mass, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, March 31; Sunday Masses, 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m., noon and 5 p.m.

Holy Thursday, April 5

Cathedral Basilica — Mass of the Holy Chrism, 10 a.m., to be celebrated by Archbishop Burke; Mass of the Lord’s Supper, 7:30 p.m., also to be celebrated by the archbishop; Tenebrae at 9 p.m.; cathedral basilica remains open until midnight for quiet prayer.

Tenebrae is an ancient service of sung psalms and scriptural readings during Holy Week that dates from medieval times. It focuses on Christ’s passion and death, ending with the hope for his resurrection that will be celebrated on Easter. In a darkened church candles are extinguished one by one until only a single candle remains lit.

Old Cathedral — Mass of the Lord’s Supper, 5:30 p.m.; basilica remains open until 10 p.m. for quiet prayer.

Good Friday, April 6

Cathedral Basilica — Morning Prayer, 9 a.m.; Solemn liturgy of Good Friday: reading of the Passion with Archbishop Burke, veneration of the Cross, distribution of Holy Communion, 3 p.m.; Stations of the Cross, 7 p.m.

Old Cathedral — Solemn liturgy of Good Friday: reading of the Passion, veneration of the Cross, distribution of Holy Communion, noon; Stations of the Cross, 3 p.m.

Holy Saturday, April 7

Cathedral Basilica — Morning Prayer, 9 a.m.; Easter Vigil, 9 p.m., to be celebrated by Archbishop Burke.

Old Cathedral — Easter Vigil, 8 p.m.

The Easter vigil cannot properly begin in any parish in the archdiocese before the end of civil twilight at 8 p.m. It must be celebrated at night.

Easter Sunday, April 8

Cathedral Basilica — Masses at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. (celebrated by Archbishop Burke) and noon.

Old Cathedral — Masses at 8 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and noon.

Holy Week at Saint Francis de Sales Oratory

From the bulletin of Saint Francis de Sales Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri.

Sunday, April 1, Palm Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Mass; 9:30 a.m. Blessing of the Palms and Procession, Solemn High Mass (note, starts a half hour earlier than normal).

Monday, April 2, in Holy Week: 8:00 a.m. Mass; 7:00 p.m. Mass.

Tuesday, April 3, in Holy Week: 8:00 a.m. Mass; 7:00 p.m. Mass.

Wednesday, April 4, in Holy Week: 8:00 a.m. Mass; 7:00 p.m. Mass.

Sacred Triduum

Thursday, April 5, Holy Thursday: 6:00 p.m. confession; 7:00 p.m. Solemn High Mass, Procession to the Repository, followed by Adoration at the Repository until Midnight

Friday, April 6, Good Friday: 8:00 a.m. Stations of the Cross and Confessions; 2 p.m.-6:30 p.m. Confessions; 3:00 p.m. Liturgy of the Passion and Death of Our Lord Jesus Christ, followed by Adoration at the Holy Sepulcher until 8 p.m.

Saturday, April 7, Easter Vigil: 8:00 p.m. confession; 9:00 p.m. Solemn High Mass; At the End of the Vigil, Blessing of Easter Food: Bread, Eggs...

Sunday, April 8, Easter Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Low Mass with organ; 10:00 a.m. Solemn High Mass.

Starting on the Tuesday in the Octave of Easter, there will be an additional Mass offered at the altar of Our Mother of Perpetual Help, at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; confession starts at 6:00 p.m.

Friday, March 30, 2007

Spring Flowers

These photos were taken on March 23rd, 2007, in suburban Saint Louis County, Missouri.











Thursday, March 29, 2007

Wednesday, March 28, 2007

Saint Francis de Sales Roman Catholic Oratory, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - shrouded statues on Saint Joseph's altarShrouded statues on Saint Joseph's Altar at Saint Francis de Sales Oratory

Tuesday, March 27, 2007

Civil War Saint Louis

AN INTERESTING WEB SITE, Civil War St. Louis, documenting the tragedy of the war in the deeply divided city:
The meeting at Planter's House hotel between Gov. Claiborne F. Jackson, Gen. Sterling Price (accompanied by Col. Thomas L. Snead) and Nathanial Lyon, Frank Blair (accompanied by Maj. Conant). It ended with Lyon making the famous proclamation as recorded by Snead:

"Finally, when the conference had lasted four or five hours, Lyon closed it, as he had opened it, Rather,' said he (he was still seated, and spoke deliberately, slowly, and with a peculiar emphasis), 'rather than concede to the State of Missouri the right to demand that my Government shall not enlist troops within her limits, or bring troops into the State whenever it pleases, or move its troops at its own will into, out of, or through the State; rather than concede to the State of Missouri for one single instant the right to dictate to my Government in any matter however unimportant, I would (rising as he said this and pointing in turn to every one in the room) see you, and you, and you, and you, and every man, woman, and child in the State, dead and buried.'

"Then turning to the Governor, he said: 'This means war. In an hour one of my officers will call for you and conduct you out of my lines.'
Detail of statue of the Apotheosis of Saint Louis, in Forest Park in Saint Louis, Missouri

Monday, March 26, 2007

Feast of the Annunciation

Because yesterday was a Sunday, today is the Feast of the Annunciation.




Mosaic of the Annunciation in Our Lady's Chapel at the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis.
Yesterday was the annual competition of the Missouri Winemaking Society, held at De Smet Jesuit High School. I've been a judge for the society for many years, and the average quality of submitted wines has been getting much better over time. Some local wines are superb, and Missouri is an excellent grape growing and winemaking region.

Wine tasting is hard work! Really!

Jesuit chapel at De Smet High School, in Creve Coeur, Missouri
Bradford pear in bloom at De Smet Jesuit High School, in Creve Coeur, Missouri.

"Warning: feminism is bad for your health"

SEE THE ARTICLE Warning: feminism is bad for your health:
For both sexes, gender equality in managerial positions was associated with lower life expectancy.

The scientists said possible explanations for the correlation is that men's health may be adversely affected by a loss of what had been seen as traditional male privileges. Women's health, meanwhile, could be being damaged by greater opportunities for risky behaviour as a result of increased income, along with stress from longer working hours.
We live in a disordered society, so it is not surprising that sickness, the disorder of the body, should increase.

It is claimed by feminists that the traditional division of labor between men and women is due to male domination keeping women down in a Marxist class struggle. We should note that the Church does recognize a power imbalance, as we read in Genesis about Eve's punishment:
To the woman also he said: I will multiply thy sorrows, and thy conceptions: in sorrow shalt thou bring forth children, and thou shalt be under thy husband’s power, and he shall have dominion over thee. (Genesis 3:16)
But equality between men and women has always been a Christian doctrine, and therefore to correct some of the consequences of the Fall of Man in Genesis, the Church has encouraged men to defer to women and not to use force on them.

Feminists claim that men and women are equal and that therefore there is no difference between them. Male chauvinists claim that men and women are different and so men are better than women. Both the feminists and chauvinists make the same error in believing that differences in kind mean differences in value. The Christian understanding is that men and women are different, but have the same value. This is common sense to everyone but university professors!

The traditional division of work reflects the sexual differences between men and women, including both material and spiritual differences. Male workplaces strongly differ in organization, environment, compensation, and requirements from female workplaces, and these differences flow quite naturally from sexual differences. This system works quite well for most men and for most women, but not for all, which is why we have so many problems today.

The feminist revolution in the 1970s attempted to destroy the distinctiveness of male workplaces for the sake of egalitarianism. The first change was overturning laws and customs that restricted certain jobs to men only; since this led to workplaces with very many men and often few women, this had to be backed up with draconian laws punishing sexual harassment. The second change was economic: the policy of equal pay for equal work.

"Equal pay for equal work", although egalitarian and popular, has enormous social justice implications. The encyclical of Pope Pius XI, Quadragesimo Anno, which encourages a living wage, is defeated by this kind of equality. The concept of a living wage states that one worker ought to be able to completely provide for a large family, have security in retirement and against disability, and that it is the duty of the employer to pay accordingly. Therefore, a middle-aged man with wife and children ought to be paid more than a young single woman without dependents, as a matter of social justice. A woman with children and no husband ought to be paid more also. Likewise, a man near retirement ought to be paid far more due to his long loyalty to the employer and his need to support himself in his old age. This apparent unfairness in wages was summed up in the phrase "You gotta pay your dues". The ability of an employer to give more compensation to someone based on their need as the head of a family, or as a reward for long-term loyalty is completely gutted by the new system. This in turn leads to calls for greater government involvement in the economy, by providing welfare to families and by old-age pensions. The current conception of a "living wage" is met merely by manipulation of the minimum-wage law, which is completely unsuitable to the needs of families and is unfair to employers.

The new system tends to reward a few elite women with high-paying jobs, while depressing the take-home wages of the bulk of workers. It also forces a larger percentage of the population into the workforce, which is disastrous to family life. But this system is good for both big business and big government, for revenues increase dramatically. The new system also tends to throw out older workers who may not be as productive or as up-to-date as their younger competitors.

The old system, which relied on marriage for the support of women, did not work for the feminists, who tend not to be suited for marriage. Likewise, boredom among ordinary women, due to small family size, makes working outside of the home also popular.

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

"Please don't kill me, I'm Catholic"

SEE THE ARTICLE Please don't kill me, I'm Catholic, over at The Devout Life:
Ah, the glories and wonders of the modern medical establishment. We need to carry cards around that say, "Being killed by hospital staff is against my religious belief and I ask that I not be murdered by deliberate dehydration as part of my freedom of religious expression."
Also see the article New Trend in Organ Donation Raises Questions:
The number of kidneys, livers and other body parts surgeons are harvesting through a controversial approach to organ donation has started to rise rapidly, a trend that is saving the lives of more waiting patients but, some say, risks sacrificing the interests of the donors.
By "sacrificing the interests of the donors", the writer actually means "killing the donors", for organ donors really aren't dead, and under the new system, could oftentimes otherwise be easily resuscitated.

"CONVERSION and CONSUMERISM"

SEE THE ARTICLE, CONVERSION and CONSUMERISM, over at The Lion and the Cardinal:
Our culture is intensely consumerist, and religion, like everything else, is presented as a consumer choice.
Daniel argues that treating faith as a consumer commodity is a concession to secularism.

Tuesday, March 20, 2007


GRIFFIN STATUE GUARDS the entrance to Saint John Vianney High School, in Kirkwood, Missouri. This mythical beast, half eagle and half lion, symbolizes strength and courage; the griffin is also a Christological symbol.

Sunday, March 18, 2007

Photos of Saint Wenceslaus Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri

HERE ARE PHOTOS of Saint Wenceslaus Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, located less than four road miles southwest of the Old Cathedral downtown.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

In the late 19th century, the Bohemian immigrant community outgrew the nearby Saint John Nepomuk Church, and so Saint Wenceslaus parish was formed in 1895. This church was dedicated in 1926.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The church was designed by the architectural firm of O'Meara & Hills, who did many other churches and ecclesiastically-related structures both locally and nationally.

In the background is Saint Francis de Sales Oratory.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Many thanks to the Pastor and parish administrator for unlocking the church for me. Unfortunately, the neighborhood has a lot of crime, and so is not kept open.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

This church has been undergoing a series of restorations lately. Note the painter in the photo! I am told that the angel statues are new, and the tabernacle has been recently relocated to the center of the sanctuary; for a while, it was in a side-chapel. I believe the tabernacle is empty in this photo.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Crucifixion painting above tabernacle.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The tabernacle.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

IHS on the altar.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

One of the new angel statues that flank the crucifixion painting.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The walls of the sanctuary are nicely painted, with numerous fleur-de-lis, and symbols of divinity.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

A view to the side of the sanctuary, showing the communion rail, and doors into Mary's chapel

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Altar of Mary.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Tabernacle in Mary's altar.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Chapel of Saint Joesph contains numerous items.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The baptismal font.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Our Lady of Charity. This shows a scene where three Cubans discover a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary and infant Jesus floating at sea. St. Mary, under her title of Our Lady of Charity is patroness of Cuba and the Archdiocese of Miami, Florida. This statue was donated by Saint Louisians of Cuban descent in 1967.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Altar of Saint Joseph has the holy oils.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Decorated ceiling of the chapel.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

View back to the choir loft.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Stained glass window showing Saint Wenceslaus (ca. 907 - 929), in armor, receiving communion. He was a duke, martyr, and patron of Bohemia. The Czech spelling of Wenceslaus is Václav.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Organ pipes.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The decorative ceiling of the nave.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Pietà statue in narthex.

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Saint Wenceslaus Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Marian grotto outside of the church.

Saint Frances Cabrini Academy, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

The church's school is Saint Frances Cabrini Academy. Eleven parishes can send their children to this school.

Anheuser-Busch Brewery, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Not too far from the church is the Budweiser brewery. Saint Wenceslaus went to school in the town of Budweis.

Address:
3014 Oregon Avenue
Saint Louis, Missouri 63118