Friday, May 02, 2008

Church Photos to be Seen on Television

MY PHOTOS of Saint Alphonsus Liguori Church will be shown on the public television station, KETC, Channel 9 in Saint Louis, on the locally-produced show Living St. Louis.

The show, which airs on Monday, May 5th at 7 p.m., and repeats on Sunday May 11th at 5 p.m., is about the rebuilding of the church after a major fire last year.

The videos will be available on the KETC website and on YouTube.

Saint Alphonsus Liguori Roman Catholic Church, in Saint Louis, Missouri, USA - high altar

The photos to be used in the show are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/msabeln/sets/72157604788294038/

These were taken about two months before the fire.

5 comments:

  1. I will wait for to see your photos of Saint Alphonsus Liguori Church which will be shown on the public television station.

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  2. Great work, Mark! You deserve this recognition.

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  3. Wasn't that the crazy liturgical goofball church?

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  4. "Wasn't that the crazy liturgical goofball church?"

    I believe that the correct term is "enculturated", which in this case, the music of the Mass is adapted to African-American culture. But in many respects, the Mass here (the time I visited) is no different than how the Missal of Pope Paul VI is celebrated most everywhere else in the U.S., except that instead of the music of the Saint Louis Jesuits, they have Jazz and Gospel. The worship was Catholic. Either the Sanctus or the Agnus Dei, or both (I can't recall), were chanted in Latin.

    The Rosary and the Our Mother of Perpetual Help devotions were prayed precisely as you would expect anywhere else, and I recall hearing quite a bit of Latin.

    Enculturation is a good and valid concept. However, it seems to have been used in recent decades as a kind of 'divide and conquer' strategy to eliminate any sense of Catholicity, as well as an excuse to jettison Greek philosophy and the Latin language.

    However, we must realize that the mission of the Church is to enculturate society, and not the other way around.

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